Iceland's first lady on the 'Secrets of the Sprakkar: Iceland's Extraordinary Women' : NPR - Chiara Bellini
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Iceland’s first lady on the ‘Secrets of the Sprakkar: Iceland’s Extraordinary Women’ : NPR

Iceland’s first lady on the ‘Secrets of the Sprakkar: Iceland’s Extraordinary Women’ : NPR

Ingibjörg H. Bjarnason, the principal of Kvennaskólinn (‘The Women’s School’) became the first woman to hold a seat in Alþingi in 1922. “As early as 1882, widows and women of independent means had received the right to vote in municipal https://www.tv.dumur.fr/2023/02/09/the-honest-truth-about-colombian-women/ elections, and in 1907, this right was extended to all women,” writes Stefan Jonasson, editor of Lögberg-Heimskringla. Alþingi voted to extend women’s voting and candidacy rights to parliamentary elections in 1911, but this was struck down—twice—by the Danish king, until Kristján X relented in 1915. Iceland became an independent state under the Danish crown in 1918, and two years later, all age and income restrictions were lifted, giving all Icelandic women equal voting rights in 1920. The campaign lasted only one day and all participants were a part of the strike for the entire day.

History teaches us that progress doesn’t come about in a vacuum and that grassroots pressure plus investment in politics is a very powerful catalyst for change. Links to external Internet sites on Library of Congress Web pages do not constitute the Library’s endorsement of the content of their Web sites or of their policies or products.

  • In 1915, women over 40 were granted the right to vote, and in 1920, the country introduced suffrage for all citizens ages 18 and up.
  • The country’s first women’s rights organization formed in 1894 and collected signatures on voting rights petitions.
  • When an entry is published for the first time, we machine-translate the Open Text fields into all of the other supported languages.
  • Ninety percent of Iceland’s female population participated in the strike.

It also has the world’s first female and openly gay head of government, Jóhanna Sigurðardóttir, who was elected prime minister in 2009. Today, observers often cite Iceland as a model of gender parity for other nations to follow. The historical arc of those achievements leads back to a period of rapid change in the country—to the salting stations of Siglufjörður and towns like it, and to the hard work of the herring girls. Herring towns grew rapidly as salting stations, processing plants and warehouses sprung up along the ever-expanding docks. Home to some 1,200 residents today, Siglufjörður reached a population of more than 3,000 by the 1940s.

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In 2009, Iceland became the first country to completely close the gender gap in education and health. And in 2016, Iceland was 87% of the way to closing the gender gap in all sectors.

Women’s suffrage

The age of settlement is considered to have hot icelandic woman ended in the year 930 with the establishment of Alþingi. Women in IcelandA procession in Bankastræti in Reykjavík on July 7th 1915 to celebrate women’s suffrage. The museum director adds, “They had to be ready to start working whenever the ships arrived.

The Role of Women in Research

The Iceland women’s national football team played its first game on 20 September 1981, facing Scotland. Bryndís Einarsdóttir scored Iceland’s first ever goal in the 2–3 loss, with Ásta B. The women’s national football team has successfully qualified for and competed in the UEFA Women’s Championship’s in 2009, 2013, and 2017.

The official law, created in 2000, is known as the Icelandic Act on Maternity/Paternity and Parental Leave. The law itself was amended in 2006 increasing parental leave from six to nine months. The government covers parental leave for birth, adoption, and foster care for all employees in Iceland, even those who are self-employed paying 80% of earned salary to new parents. Parents split the time of leave equally to ensure children grow up with equal care from both parents, and workplaces are balanced. Within the law there are nine defined areas of gender discrimination. It identifies differences between indirect and direct gender discrimination, acknowledges gaps in wages, and recognizes that gender-based violence is detrimental to society. Here are seven laws and standard practices that support women’s rights, and penalize gender discrimination.

The Daughters of Reykjavik are a feminist rap collective who rap about gender issues. For centuries, this seafaring nation’s women stayed at home as their husbands traversed the oceans.

They are currently ranked as the 17th best women’s national team in the world by FIFA as of December 2019. At the 2013 UEFA Women’s Championship, they took their first point in a major championship, following a draw against Norway in the opening game. Iceland has national women’s teams for basketball, handball, volleyball, and the women’s national football team which represents Iceland in international women’s football.

During her time as president she used her position to focus on youth and to support forestry, while promoting Icelandic language and culture. After her retirement as president in 1996, Vigdis went on to become “founding chair of the Council of Women World Leaders at the John F. Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University”. Two years later, in 1998, she was appointed president of the Unesco World Commission on the Ethics of Scientific Knowledge and Technology. In the wake of the 2008–2011 Icelandic financial crisis, there was a swing towards female leadership.

The Icelandic government has said it aims to close the gender pay gap in Iceland by 2022. In 1881, Iceland extended women’s rights in Iceland by allowing them to vote in local elections for the very first time.